Financial Hardship Letters

Writing An Unemployment Benefits Denial Appeal Letter

The job market today still has some problems and there are some claims for unemployment compensation. However, when people apply to receive this type of benefit, their request may be denied for some reason. Indeed, employers are within their rights to deny or dispute any claim, and there are various reasons as to why a claim may be disallowed in its entirety. You have to meet some very stringent rules and regulations and those are not always in your favor. There could be loopholes, however, and it is also possible that a mistake was made in denying your claim. Hence, if you feel that you do deserve compensation, then you should appeal the decision. Below are the steps to follow in writing an unemployment benefits denial appeal letter.

1. Have Your Paperwork in Order

You must write an appeal letter to start the process. Winning a case on appeal is quite common, particularly if you are able to demonstrate that some information has been overlooked, or if new information is available. The appeal letter itself is a formality, but it is an important one. It must be properly addressed to the right agency and department. It is usual that there are several divisions within an agency, so addressing it to the correct place is essential to have your appeal considered as soon as possible. There may also be an appeal form that you have to complete. If so, add it to your letter, rather than using it to replace your letter in full.

2. Write a Professional Letter

Officials will closely scrutinize the letter that you have written. Hence, it should be professional and you should make sure that there are no spelling and grammar mistakes. What you need to aim for is effective communication that encourages officials to consider your story.

Make sure that you start your letter by indicating the case number and why your claim had been denied. Then immediately follow with explanation as to why you believe this to be unfair or incorrect. If you have any evidence to prove your point, include this in your letter of appeal as well. Any evidence that you have of unfair treatment by your employer or of false allegations must be added to your letter as documented attachments.

3. Get Your Witnesses Together

Last but not least, if you make any claims that have been witnessed by others, or if you have witnesses to prove that the claims made against you are untrue, this has to be added as well. Their names and contact details should be included in your letter. This is important information that will usually grant you at least the right to have your case looked at once more.

You do have to be careful not to make your letter too long. The recommendation of experts is to stick to no more than two paragraphs: one explains the original situation and other explains the new evidence. Do not expect that those who will read the letter will be able to absorb everything if you make the letter longer than that.

Unemployment Benefits Denial Appeal Letter Example

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